03/03/2013

Negative reps that is......

In every functional movement, there are two parts - the positive (also known as the concentric, contracting, lifting or shortening) phase, and the negative (eccentric, relaxing, lowering, or shortening) phase.

Due to the physiology of our muscles, we are able to apply approx 10-15% more force during the negative part of a movement.  I used super slow negatives during my masters research, to induce muscle soreness in my hapless subjects, so that I could measure the tissue breakdown......

But we can use negative reps in a positive way!  To get better at difficult bodyweight movements.

  • Pullups

  • HSPU

  • Pistols

  • Pushups

These four movements respond fantastically to negative rep training.  If you can't do any of the above exercises, then consider adding in some negative reps to your week.

Start out with just one set of five super slow reps at the beginning or end of a workout.  Super slow means as slow as you can manage without actually coming to a stop.  It will likely be between 3-10 seconds, with the aim being to hit 10-15econds for all reps.

Make sure you maintain the tension over the full range of motion eg, no putting your feet down before you've lowered ALL the way to full stretch on a pull up.

When you can do 5 reps at 10 sec or more, test the movement, and you might surprise yourself with a 1-2 full reps!!  And then the sky is the limit!

WOD

Work up to a heavy Snatch single in 10mins, then
Every minute, on the minute, for 10 minutes, 2-3 x HangSnatch
Then,
10 KB Snatch 32/20kg
10 Burpee Box Jump
AMRAP in 6mins

S+C

Snatch grip Deadlift
- sets of 5
Then,
Every minute, on the minute, for 10 minutes, Power Shrug + Hang Power Snatch
Then,
10 DB Snatch
10 Burpee
AMRAP in 6minsNegative reps that is......

In every functional movement, there are two parts - the positive (also known as the concentric, contracting, lifting or shortening) phase, and the negative (eccentric, relaxing, lowering, or shortening) phase.

Darren Ellis